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A monkey documentary binge watching day.

Rags's picture

"Family power is the foundation of success for primates."

Hmmmm.  We, the hairless apes, are primates.

So, are the manipulations by baggage XWs/XHs and their failed family progeny attempts to maintain family power and success as primates?  Is there some ingrained ancient aversion to loss of family power and  related loss of standing in the greater community of hairless ape primates?

Does the new power dynamic created when a dad or mom repartners drive a toxic defense of the failed family power structure and lower power standing?

Damn. I have way to much time on my hands.

 

Rags's picture

I have finished the laundry, cleaned the kitchen, picked up DW's Rx's from the pharmacy, dropped off the used Nespresso pods to UPS back to Nespresso for recycling...

What the hell else am I going to do but watch Monkey Documentaries?

I need a job!!!!

Before I drive myself crazy.  Though it is probaby too late.

Yesterdays's picture

You're right it probably is all related and tied in somehow. Makes sense why the step families are so far removed from feeling a sense of normalcy. What is the name of the documentary.

Not related much to your story but have you seen "My Octopus Teacher.". It's amazing. Sounds like you have time on your hands to watch lol. I thought it was pretty good. 

Rags's picture

Yes, I saw it.  My Octopus Teacher is a wonderful movie.

Intersting and lots of feels.

I agree with you that it is amazing and I recommend that everyone see it.

I don't remember which documentary the primate family power thing was on.  I watched several of them in a row on PBS.

MorningMia's picture

I loved My Octopus Teacher! I love learning about primates, too. Rags may be on to something. 

CLove's picture

I think youve hit that nail on the head. And when there are no children from the re-marriage the balance of power (needs of children from previous partnership) skews over. In some cases.

And you should watch the Wham Documentary too Biggrin

Rags's picture

I listened to them regularly in HS.  A bit earler, I also listened to The Knack. I had eclectic music tasests in my teens.  Rock, Pop, classic early rock, CCR, Eagles, Elvis, Beatles, Stones, Zeplin, Hendricks, Heart, Dickey Betts, Pat Travers, Foreigner, Rush, Pink Floyd, Van Halen, classical, gospel (spending summers with my grand parents) etc......... My great uncle was a renown gospel singer. He sang The Lords Prayer at my first wedding.

But, what got me into music is my dad. He has a beautiful voice.  He would sing all of the time when I was very young and while we were growing up. He would singe to mom, they would dance, etc... In the reel to reel tape days he would make massive music collection party tapes for parties my parents would have at oru home when they were with the US State Department overseas.  Their friends would badger my dad for his party tapes or for him to make new ones for their parties.

Growing up internationally I had a massive music collection (Attorney's cover your ears).  Pirated music was huge and there were entire streets of music store after music store after music store with thousands upon thousands of recordings of anything you could possibly want to hear.  Because legitimate albums (cassettes) were not always the same length of blank casset tapes that the piraters would speed dub onto the blanks there would often be a couple of extra songs at the end of each side when the actual album is shorter than the blank. I discovered some great artists from those bonus songs on pirated cassette tapes.  The one example that sticks out is from one of Madonna's albums.  When I first heart a legitimate copy of that album I was irritated that there were songs missing.  It took me quite a while to find who the artist actually was for those songs.  The piraters actually would do a good job of matching bonus material to the pirated main artist.

But... I digress.